Feeling Moody...

Captured by STL artist, Monti Hill | sinseetize.com

Captured by STL artist, Monti Hill | sinseetize.com

thrftd:

Second-Hand Cinema

This fiber artist, Xenobia Bailey, learned to “funk it together” by watching the women in her community beautify their environments with limited resources and a ton of creativity.

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allthingsjamesbaldwin:

Bayard Rustin & James Baldwin©1963 (image credit: Associated Press)
James Baldwin, right, author, and Bayard Rustin, Deputy Director of the March on Washington, comment upon Alabama incidents during a press conference in New York City on September 18, 1963. The two civil rights leaders called upon President John F. Kennedy to use troops to “break the hold” of Governor Wallace of Alabama, otherwise “there will be rioting in Alabama” which will affect the entire nation. They display arm bands to be worn at a rally scheduled in New York September 22 “to protest the brutal murder of Negro children in Birmingham.” (AP Photo)

allthingsjamesbaldwin:

Bayard Rustin & James Baldwin
©1963 (image credit: Associated Press)

James Baldwin, right, author, and Bayard Rustin, Deputy Director of the March on Washington, comment upon Alabama incidents during a press conference in New York City on September 18, 1963. The two civil rights leaders called upon President John F. Kennedy to use troops to “break the hold” of Governor Wallace of Alabama, otherwise “there will be rioting in Alabama” which will affect the entire nation. They display arm bands to be worn at a rally scheduled in New York September 22 “to protest the brutal murder of Negro children in Birmingham.” (AP Photo)

silverslipper:

HELP SUPPORT THE BLACK AMERICANA SERIES (CLICK HERE)

“BLACK AMERICANA:  The Photo-Essay” 

Vol. 1 - Island in the Sun

“Black Americana” is a four part photo-essay presenting a commentary on Black American life and patriotism.

When we weren’t marching, dodging fire hoses, and police dogs biting at our brown skin – when we weren’t singing songs of freedom, and training how to peacefully resist in southern sit-ins, we were doing what other Americans did – we went to the beach. “Island in the Sun”, a first installment in the ground-breaking series “Black Americana” re-introduces, and reclaims the image – the representation of free Black women and men living their lives openly and beautifully. The series seeks to offer a broader lens of Black American life not often seen – a restoration of Black bodies on a summer day in 1950’s America. “The beach setting is significant.” says Brandon Littlejohn, Creative Producer of “Black Americana”. “Beaches are visually associated with affluence in urban areas because of Black people’s limited access.” Littlejohn continues, “I wanted to capture Black young women and men in these spaces, because after all, this was a reality for Black people during this time.” This is the other side of the southern Black domestic worker; the other side of the Black male porter. This too was Black American life, in all of its splendor.

- Geneva S. Thomas

Creative Producer - Brandon Littlejohn

Photographer - Rod Gailes OBC

Wardrobe Design - Jamari Walker

Makeup Design - Dominique Jenelle

Hair Design - Shirlonda Brailsford

Casting - Latrice Davis

Women’s Bathing Suits designed by D’ Angelo Scott

Models - (Tope Alabi, Desmond Amofah, Ngozi Assata, Tradell Hawkins, Stephanie Kyereme, Titilayo Mutushi, Robert Vance)

______________________________________________________________________________________

Creative Producer, Brandon Littlejohn, and Photographer, Rod Gailes OBC, are collaborating to create a brilliant four-part photography series that showcases classic American settings through an Afro-Elite lens. The “Black Americana” series encourages African Americans to challenge societal messages about Blackness, while aspiring to higher levels of art and education on their own terms. Creating opportunities in the creative industry via a collective effort and artistically challenging the way African Americans have been conditioned to see themselves are two main goals of the “Black Americana” series. 

-Taylor N. Lewis

(Source: black-americana)

lacienegasmiled:

The side of Michael Jackson they don’t show you: his ACTUAL RACE.

On 6th February 1984, after winning an unprecedented number of AMA awards Michael spoke to black publication JET magazine about people in his life he was thankful for; Stevie Wonder, who expresses pride of race in his music.

“That’s why I love Stevie Wonder’s album called Songs in The Key of Life… He had a song called Black Man and I just jumped up screaming when I heard that record because he’s showing the world what the Black man has done and what other races have done… He named it Black Man and all these people who have got the album sing it. And that’s the best way to bring about the truth.”